Filmmakers to create ‘My Summer with Elvis’

News: Filmmakers to create 'My Summer with Elvis'


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New Houston The Little Gym Franchise to Open in The Heights

-- The Little Gym of Houston Heights opens its doors Monday, April 1 and local parents are invited to bring their families to a free Open House Saturday, April 12.
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: Wormshill is a small village and civil parish within the Borough of Maidstone, Kent, England. It lies on an exposed high point of the North Downs, 11 miles north of Maidstone and within the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Archaeological and toponymic evidence of Wormshill's existence predates its appearance in the Domesday survey of 1086. Its name derived from the Anglo-Saxon god Wōden and means "Woden's Hill". The village contains a number of heritage-listed buildings, which include a Norman church , a public house and one of the oldest surviving post office buildings in the United Kingdom. The Bredgar and Wormshill Light Railway runs between two small stations in nearby woodland. The fields and woodland surrounding Wormshill have changed little in the past 500 years, and the village itself remains rural with a low population density compared to the national average. Because of geography and restrictions on development, building in the village has been scant since the 1960s and 1970s. The population of 200 is a mixture of agricultural workers employed by local farms and professional residents who commute to nearby towns.
: Wormshill is a small village and civil parish within the Borough of Maidstone, Kent, England. It lies on an exposed high point of the North Downs, 11 miles north of Maidstone and within the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Archaeological and toponymic evidence of Wormshill's existence predates its appearance in the Domesday survey of 1086. Its name derived from the Anglo-Saxon god Wōden and means "Woden's Hill". The village contains a number of heritage-listed buildings, which include a Norman church , a public house and one of the oldest surviving post office buildings in the United Kingdom. The Bredgar and Wormshill Light Railway runs between two small stations in nearby woodland. The fields and woodland surrounding Wormshill have changed little in the past 500 years, and the village itself remains rural with a low population density compared to the national average. Because of geography and restrictions on development, building in the village has been scant since the 1960s and 1970s. The population of 200 is a mixture of agricultural workers employed by local farms and professional residents who commute to nearby towns.
: Wormshill is a small village and civil parish within the Borough of Maidstone, Kent, England. It lies on an exposed high point of the North Downs, 11 miles north of Maidstone and within the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Archaeological and toponymic evidence of Wormshill's existence predates its appearance in the Domesday survey of 1086. Its name derived from the Anglo-Saxon god Wōden and means "Woden's Hill". The village contains a number of heritage-listed buildings, which include a Norman church , a public house and one of the oldest surviving post office buildings in the United Kingdom. The Bredgar and Wormshill Light Railway runs between two small stations in nearby woodland. The fields and woodland surrounding Wormshill have changed little in the past 500 years, and the village itself remains rural with a low population density compared to the national average. Because of geography and restrictions on development, building in the village has been scant since the 1960s and 1970s. The population of 200 is a mixture of agricultural workers employed by local farms and professional residents who commute to nearby towns.
: Wormshill is a small village and civil parish within the Borough of Maidstone, Kent, England. It lies on an exposed high point of the North Downs, 11 miles north of Maidstone and within the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Archaeological and toponymic evidence of Wormshill's existence predates its appearance in the Domesday survey of 1086. Its name derived from the Anglo-Saxon god Wōden and means "Woden's Hill". The village contains a number of heritage-listed buildings, which include a Norman church , a public house and one of the oldest surviving post office buildings in the United Kingdom. The Bredgar and Wormshill Light Railway runs between two small stations in nearby woodland. The fields and woodland surrounding Wormshill have changed little in the past 500 years, and the village itself remains rural with a low population density compared to the national average. Because of geography and restrictions on development, building in the village has been scant since the 1960s and 1970s. The population of 200 is a mixture of agricultural workers employed by local farms and professional residents who commute to nearby towns.

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